Tried & meh: L'oréal Pure Clay Masks

As I told you in the blogpost about Multimasking, that went live last week, a lot of companies have come out with facial masks specifically meant for multimasking. One of those companies is L'Oréal. A few months ago, L'Oréal came out with the Pure Clay Masks. These three masks have the same base, consisting of three kinds of clay, but with different added extracts to give each of them their own specific problem solving properties.

The L'Oréal Pure Clay Masks. Each of them has it's own specific use and targets specific skin issues.

The L'Oréal Pure Clay Masks. Each of them has it's own specific use and targets specific skin issues.

First, let's talk a little bit about the common base of these facial masks.
The base of the masks consists of three kinds of pure clay: Kaolin, Montmorillonite and Ghassoul or Maroccan lava clay.
Kaolin is also known as China clay, white clay or kaolinite clay. It is a naturally occurring clay that is used in a whole bunch of products, ranging from skincare, to toothpaste, to paper and even lightbulbs. Quite a lot of cosmetic products have kaolin in them, but the question remains, why? Kaolin is known to help control sebum production, so it's an excellent clay to use when you have more oily skin. Other than that, it also helps to clear up acne and helps improve the circulation in your skin. Unfortunately, there hasn't been a lot of research into this clay and it's effect so there's not much more I can tell you about it. 
The next clay used in the base of this facial masks in Montmorillonite. Montmorillonite (also sometimes called Bentonite, even thought that's not really the same thing) is actually a group of minerals, that form a clay when they are dehydrated. These minerals can work wonders on your skin. Montmorillonite can help control the production of sebum, just like Kaolin does but other than that, it also helps to unclog pores and reduce the size of your pores. And last but definitely not least, it draws out the toxins from your skin, because of it's very strong negative charge.
Lastly, there's Ghassoul, also known as Rhassoul or Maroccon lava clay.
This clay is also very rich in minerals, it contains silicon, iron, magnesium, potassium, sodium and lithium. It has been used for centuries to care for skin and hair. Studies have shown that this clay is excellent for reducing dryness and flakiness, it helps remove impurities and unblock pores and it has been proven to improve skin clarity and elasticity. So this is a great clay to combine with the kaolin if you think about it. The kaolin reduces oilyness, while the ghassoul helps to make sure you don't dry out your skin too much.

So that's already a pretty great base to start with. To this base, some natural extracts have been added, each with it's own properties, to give each mask its specific use.

The Purity Mask

The Green Pure Clay Mask, also known as the Purity Mask. This mask contains eucalyptus extract, which is known for its purifying properties.

The Green Pure Clay Mask, also known as the Purity Mask. This mask contains eucalyptus extract, which is known for its purifying properties.

This green mask is supposed to purify and mattify your skin. To the base, eucalyptus-extract has been added, to give this mask its purifying properties.
Eucalyptus oil, extracted from the dried leaves of the eucalyptus tree, is known to heal skin irritations and therefore it's a great product to use on your skin when you suffer from acne. It helps sooth the skin and reduce any redness that may occur. Other than that it's also commonly used to help heal wounds and cuts and it has a very pleasant aroma that is often used in aromatherapy. 

The Glow Mask

The Red Pure Clay Mask, also known as the Glow Mask. This mask contains red algae extract, known for its brightening properties.

The Red Pure Clay Mask, also known as the Glow Mask. This mask contains red algae extract, known for its brightening properties.

This red mask is a little different than the two other Pure Clay Masks since this one has a little bit of a grain to it, due to the milled apricot seeds that have been added. Because of this graininess, it's an excellent exfoliant. When you remove this mask, after you have let it dry down completely, you can use this as an exfoliant by rinsing it off in little circular motions. That way you will be left with a more glowing skin.
This mask once again uses the same base that we've already discussed earlier in this blogpost. To this base, red algae extract has been added to give the mask its brightening properties.
Red algae help stabilize minerals that aid in skin moisturization, that way, giving back your natural glow to your skin.
Out of all the masks, I think this one is my favorite. I really like the graininess of this mask.

The Detox Mask

The Black Pure Clay Mask also known as the Detox Mask. This mask contains charcoal-extract to give it its detoxifying qualities.

The Black Pure Clay Mask also known as the Detox Mask. This mask contains charcoal-extract to give it its detoxifying qualities.

And last but not least, there's the Detox Mask. To this mask, charcoal-extract has been added to give it its detoxifying properties.
Charcoal helps draw out oil, dirt and other harmful substances form clogged pores, thus leaving your face clean and clarified. It also helps fight acne. That's why it's a product commonly found in clarifying face masks, like this one.

So that all sounds pretty amazing, right? However, I'm not a big fan of these masks. I don't really like them, yet I don't dislike them either, I'm just kind of indifferent towards them. I think they're not great, but they're not bad either, they're just meh. Let me try and explain.
First of all, the price of these masks is absolutely amazing! Each of these masks costs €9,99 for 50ml of product, so that's a pretty good deal if you ask me. Even if you decide to buy all three of them (which I did), you're still only down €30, which compared to a lot of other skincare brands, is still pretty affordable for facial masks. So I'm big fan of the price tag on these!
However, I don't feel like these masks do a lot for my skin (especially the green one). I can see some effects, but not as much as I would like. Especially when it comes to masks advertised to be used for multimasking, I want my masks to really do miracles for my skin. I want my masks to be a bit more aggressive since I'm only using them on the areas of my face that need help on a specific problem (whether that's oilyness, or clogged pores or dryness,...). 
And lastly, the thing that annoys me most about this masks is the descriptions on what to use these for. I had to do some thorough research on these masks before I figured out what each of them was really supposed to do. Every single one of these says it helps unclog your pores or helps detox the skin. So for masks that are advertised as multimasking masks, I think they could've made it more clear what problem areas on your face you should use each one for. 

In conclusion, I will use up these masks ('cause I did pay for them), but I don't see myself repurchasing these. I'd rather spend a bit more money on my masks if that means I get better results. However, if you are on a budget and really want to give multimasking a try, go for it! Like I said, they're not bad at all, they're just not what I am looking for in a mask. 

I hope you enjoyed this post and stay tuned for another blogpost on some facial masks I do really like!

Talk to you soon,
Nakiska